Borage

After a bit of rain the sun returned and the bees are all over the borage blossoms. I love the gentle hum of bees. They are the heartbeat of the garden, truly. And you won’t find a busier community of bees than that around the borage.

They say borage isn’t the prettiest of plants, but I find it enchanting. The first time I saw it was during a visit to Earthbound Farms in Carmel Valley. We walked through their kitchen garden, and there beside the flush of chamomile blossoms grew a tall and prickly green plant with the loveliest clusters of purple-blue star flowers.

We sowed borage last spring, but they languished and never grew taller than a foot. This spring we were surprised to find a single, stalwart volunteer. Amidst a thick tangle of weeds and dried sunflower stalks, he grew mighty as a four-foot oak (now bound in a beautiful love-tangle with the pomegranate.)







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The pumpkin seedsling sprouted two weeks ago and are growing quickly. I’ll need to thin the mounds of two or more seedlings down to one. (This part I do not like.) The more robust of the seedlings is the one to keep, of course. The one most interested in growing up, we like to say. (If I’ve learned anything in life, it’s that dilly-dallying with anything or anyone who refuses to mature is not a good idea. Garden lessons are life lessons, to be sure.)

The tiny zinnia seedlings are also growing, and will have to be thinned momentarily. We’ll sow another round of zinnias in a week, to ensure a steady burst of blooms until mid-December. Gardening is all about tomorrows. And who doesn’t want their tomorrows to be filled with flowers?





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And as with every other green thing, my ‘Succulent Wreath’ cross stitch has been growing. This project has been a delight. I look forward to it every day, and it always leaves me in a place of calm. But truth be told, I’m a little anxious about finishing it; So much life and love is involved in every stitch – it’s hard to come to the end of it.

I plan on framing it simply, in an 8-inch wooden hoop. I’ll share a bit more about that soon.





We’re looking forward to introducing Trellis & Thyme’s first cross stitch sampler. The design is truly heartwarming! More on that very soon.

We hope these days find you with hope and in good cheer.

‘Till next time, cheerio!

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2 Comments

  1. I love borage too!! My original ones withered and died, but I have two in a protected spot now and so far they’re flourishing. 🙂 In medieval times soldiers would drink borage wine to give them courage. 🙂

    1. How lovely! Borage wine sounds heavenly. And I must say, I love all the medieval things you share. (I make the yogurt fry bread regularly.) You should write a book on it, Krista. 🙂

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